Corona Virus Resources

Frequently Asked Questions

A new corona virus was first reported in Wuhan, China by the World Health Organization (WHO) Country Office on December 31, 2019. A pneumonia of unknown which began to widespread across the region in rapid numbers killing hundreds of people daily.

The outbreak pressed the WHO to declare a Public Health Emergency of International Concern on 30 January 2020.

On February 11, the WHO named the disease caused by the new corona virus: COVID-19. Both the virus and the disease were unknown before the outbreak began in Wuhan. The overwhelming majority of cases were initially concentrated in China; however, the disease as we know has spread worldwide. On March 11, the WHO declared the COVID-19 outbreak a global pandemic.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) as an infectious disease caused by the newly discovered coronavirus. Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses, most of which are harmless for humans. Four types are known to cause colds, and two other types can cause severe lung infections: Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS). The novel coronavirus is now known as SARS-CoV-2, because of its similarities to the virus that causes SARS. This new coronavirus seems to target cells in the lungs, and possibly other cells in the respiratory system too. Cells infected by the virus will produce more virus particles, which can then spread to other people, for instance by coughing.

Diseases are named to enable discussion on disease prevention, spread, transmissibility, severity and treatment. Human disease preparedness and response is WHO’s role, so diseases are officially named by WHO in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD). ICTV announced “severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)” as the name of the new virus on 11 February 2020. This name was chosen because the virus is genetically related to the coronavirus responsible for the SARS outbreak of 2003. While related, the two viruses are different.

The WHO announced “COVID-19” as the name of this new disease on 11 February 2020, following guidelines previously developed with the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO).

The virus is primarily spread from person to person, including by people who appear to have no symptoms. This makes it much harder to get a good picture of the way it’s spreading.

The WHO notes that coronavirus can be transmitted primarily through droplets of saliva or discharge from the nose or mouth which are spread when an infected person coughs or sneezes. People can catch  by touching objects or surfaces contaminated with the virus, and then touching their eyes, nose, or mouth. People can also be infected if they breathe in droplets from a person with coronavirus who coughs out or exhales droplets. The WHO recommends social distancing- staying more than three feet away from a person who is sick.

The latest estimates are that 80 percent of the people who get infected with the new coronavirus will experience a mild or moderate form of disease. Roughly 15 percent will develop a severe form of the disease requiring hospitalization. Some 5 percent will become critically ill. The high level of supportive and intensive care required to treat patients with COVID-19 places real challenges to even the most advanced health care systems.

COVID-19 is more dangerous for elderly people or people suffering from other infections or ailments. Children so far seem to be less affected by the disease. The mortality rates vary significantly from place to place. Public health measures such as isolation, quarantine, and social distancing are generally put in place to limit community transmission, reduce the number of new cases and severely ill patients, protect the most vulnerable people, and manage health resources.

Prevention as we know is the key to all disease. For the COVID-19 Disease, it is extremely important to protect yourself and others too. As with other Coronaviruses, droplet infection seems to be the main mode of transmission. The virus enters the human body through the eyes, mouth or nose. This can happen by breathing in infected droplets, or by touching a surface on which droplets have landed, and then touching your eyes, nose, or mouth later.

Infection control measures such as good handwashing for 20 seconds and proper coughing and sneeze etiquette are highly effective and important for prevention.

Hand hygiene is essential; therefore, the CDC recommends that you wash your hands often with soap and water. Make sure to use enough soap to ensure that all parts of both your hands are washed. Spend at least 20 seconds washing your hands. If there is no visible dirt on your hands, or soap and water is not available, an alcohol-based gel is also a good option but wash your hands as soon as you are able to.

CDC recommends that you stay home when you are sick and avoid contact with other people. If you are coughing or sneezing, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or with the inside of your elbow. Throw used tissues into a wastebasket immediately and wash your hands.

Social distancing is advised in places with community transmission of the virus. Avoid crowded places and large gatherings, and generally keep some physical distance between you and other people.

Currently, there are no specific vaccine or treatments for COVID-19. The WHO postulates that there are ongoing clinical trials evaluating potential treatments.

Given the current situation with the supplies to protect our healthcare and the general public. H.A.N.A will educate the public by sharing relevant information on the COVID-19 outbreak.

COVID-19 TESTING FACILITIES IN MIAMI-DADE, BROWARD, THE KEYS & PALM BEACH COUNTIES.

Most sites are by appointment only! Here’s what you need to know!

Most centers are drive-thru only, which means you need to be in a car or truck with a working window. You should also put gas in your vehicle before you go, wait times could be at least two hours. There are a few walk up centers in Broward County.

Each of the centers also has criteria for testing eligibility and different sets of hours. This list will be continuously updated as more testing sites begin to open. Please visit the counties testing site page. Links are provided for each county below.

Who can be tested?

People who are 65 or older with COVID-19 symptoms and have chronic conditions. You must show I.D. Individuals who are experiencing COVID-19 symptoms and have recently traveled internationally on a cruise or plane or have a compromised immune system. You must show I.D.

Recently traveled to any of the affected countries or have been in contact with someone who has the novel corona virus. They must also be experiencing symptoms such as fever, cough or shortness of breath.

Healthcare workers and first responders, including police and firefighters, Hialeah and Miami city employees, and federal employees, including air marshals, Immigration and Customs Enforcement workers and those who staff detention centers. The individual must also be experiencing COVID-19 symptoms.

West Parking Lots – 501 Marlins Way, Miami, FL 33125
Seven days a week starting at 9 a.m.

You must first make an appointment by calling 305-499-8767 after 9 a.m. If you call before 9 a.m., you will not be able to connect. Anyone without an appointment will be turned away.

The call center will open from 9 a.m. until all appointment slots for the next day have been filled. For now, daily testing is available at this site for 200 people.

10901 Coral Way, Miami, FL 33165
Enter by Southwest 107th Avenue at Southwest 20th Street
Seven days a week starting at 9 a.m.

You must first make an appointment by calling 305-499-8767 after 9 a.m. If you call before 9 a.m., you will not be able to connect. Anyone without an appointment will be turned away.

The call center will open from 9 a.m. until all appointment slots for the next day have been filled. For now, daily testing is available at this site for 300 people.

East Parking Lot – 347 Don Shula Drive, Miami Gardens, FL 33056
Seven days a week starting at 9 a.m.

Testing requirements

  • Individuals of any age with COVID-19 symptoms
  • Individuals who believe they have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19, even if they are not currently experiencing symptoms
  • All first responders (firefighters, law enforcement/corrections) and healthcare workers, including any staff members working at long-term care facilities, with a valid agency ID

Nurses will screen clients to determine their eligibility for testing. Those who do not meet the criteria will be turned away. Those tested will be instructed to wait 48 to 72 hours for notification of results from a health representative.

Amelia Earhardt Park

401 E. 65th Street, Hialeah, FL 33013
Enter at Palm Avenue and East 65th Street entrance. Testing will occur at the rotunda immediately adjacent to the entrance.
Hours: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Saturday.

You must first make an appointment by calling 305-COVID19 after 9 a.m.

The call center will open at 9 a.m. until the appointment slots for the following day are filled.

Address: 200 City Marina

Testing Hours: By appointment

Monroe County residents who are feeling COVID-19 symptoms and have made an appointment by calling 305-252-4820.

Please visit the City of Miami Dade County web page for more sites and recommendations at https://www.miamidade.gov/global/initiatives/coronavirus/testing-locations.page

560 NW 27th Avenue, Fort Lauderdale
9AM – 6 PM (Tuesday – Saturday)

Walk-up testing begins on Saturday, April 18th. Mobile drive-thru testing is not permitted at this site. Appointments are preferred. People experiencing symptoms of COVD-19 should call 954-412-7300 for an appointment. Please be sure to wear a face covering when arriving for testing. Site is operated by the Florida Department of Health in Broward County and the Urban League of Broward County.

901 NW 10th Street, Pompano Beach
9AM – 6 PM (every day except Thursday)

No car is required for this site which will be open every day of the week except Thursday. People experiencing symptoms should call 954-412-7300 for an appointment prior to visiting. Please be sure to wear a face covering when arriving for testing. Site is operated by the Florida Department of Health in Broward County.

3700 NW 11th Place, Lauderhill 33311
Mondays-Saturdays, 9AM – 1PM

Prospective patients must be pre-screened and meet CDC and DOH testing guidelines, have a prescription and be preregistered for an appointment through the Broward Health call center at 954-320-5730.

3250 Meridian Parkway, Weston

Monday – Friday 8:00am until 5:00pm

Potential patients should call the Cleveland Clinic Florida appointment center at 954-659-5951 to be scheduled for a test. Callers will be screened by a nurse who will determine whether the caller meets the federal testing criteria.

Please visit the City of Miami Dade County web page for more sites and recommendations at

https://www.broward.org/CoronaVirus/Pages/Collection-Sites.aspx